Brac

Brac

BRAC

SERVICE

BRAC has set up 16 social enterprises addressing community needs and providing jobs to many. Its flagship social enterprise is the retail outlet Aarong Craft Shops in Bangladesh, reaches more than 65,000 artisans. Its dairy business, BRAC Dairy, collects milk from 54,000 marginalized farmers and has 20-30% of market share.

With the profit, BRAC can offer free education programs to build skills and training for decent jobs in growth sectors.

BUSINESS MODEL

Around 1980, funding for BRAC’s programmes was nearly 100% donors.  BRAC pioneered the first sustainable social business privitization model. By the mid 1990s, BRAC had already reduced external funding to about 50%. Today, the organization generates 80% of its $485 million budget from its wholly owned social businesses.

IMPACT

Place: Bangladesh (70,000 villages), Afghanistan (4854 schools), Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan.

Scale:  110 million poor people per year are impacted (75% of the Bangladeshi population), 2 million children enrolled in schools

Depth
  • Child mortality rate in Bangladesh dropped from 20% to 5%
  • Built the Bangladesh’s skills sector, helping people to get out of poverty
  • Supporting entrepreneurs
  • Improving working conditions with SMEs and strengthening value chains

ORIGINS

When the war ended in Bangladesh in December 1971, Fazle Hasan Abed, an executive for Shell in the UK, sold his flat in London and returned to the newly independent Bangladesh to find his country in ruins. Abed decided to use the funds he had generated from selling his flat to found BRAC to improve the living conditions of the rural poor.

BRAC initially concentrated on programmes that included agriculture, fisheries, cooperatives, rural crafts, adult literacy, health and family planning, vocational training for women and construction of community centres.

In 1974, BRAC set up its first social business to finance its programmes : a printing press.  Owning a press was a way to cut printing costs and to open up the future relevance of schools curricula and cultural evolution. In its first year of operation, the press made $17,400 in profits. In 2007, it was generating $340,000 in profits

BRAC used the profits from its printing press business to fight dehydration, the leading cause of high child mortality rate in Bangladesh. BRAC trained 4,000 oral rehydration workers (ORWs) and then sent them out to educate some 30,000 families on how to make an electrolyte-rich fluid for children with diarrhea. BRAC used a performance-based incentive system for the workers: the more each parent remembered, the higher the ORW’s salary. The program played a major role in halving the country’s infant mortality rates.

While the oral rehydration campaign was in full force, BRAC launched the social business of Aarong Craft Shops. Aarong helps 65,000 rural artisans market and sell their handicrafts and has become the most popular handicraft marketing operation in Bangladesh.

Using revenues from Aarong, BRAC began testing microfinance and primary education initiatives. When the oral rehydration campaign concluded in the 1990s, BRAC was ready to scale up its most successful microfinance and education programs.

BRAC also trains and employs workers in its dairy and milk collection center, trained workers to inseminate or vaccinate cows, trained workers to become para veterinarians, or trained silkworm rearers and spinners.

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • In 2001, BRAC established a university called BRAC University.
  • BRAC’s Informal schooling system in 2007 has established : 20,000 pre-primary, 32,000 primary, 2000 secondary schools.
  • To provide education through internet, BRAC partnered with San Francisco- based gNet to create bracNet, which is building Bangladesh’s high-speed network from scratch.
  • BRAC has also started to replicate internationally, in Afghanistan (4854 schools), Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan.
  • BRAC is the world’s largest non-governmental organization with over 120,000 employees.

GET INVOLVED !

Shop

Buy handicrafts from rural artisans from Bangladesh, from one of Brac’s social enterprise Aarong Craft.

Work for Brac

Find jobs or internships in Bangladesh or other countries to help Brac reach its social mission.

As a visitor

BRAC welcomes visitors from around the world to experience firsthand its wide range of actions and innovations (national & international government officials, donor agencies, prospective partners, academia and individual practitioners).

Too Good To Go

Too Good To Go

Too Good To Go

SOLUTION

Too Good To Go is an app which uses a geo-targeted map to show users the restaurants closest to them with leftover food available for collection at special time, at great price.   

BUSINESS MODEL

Too Good To Go sells food that they buy from the stores at a great price. Stores make extra cash on food that would have otherwise cost them to throw out.   Customers win by getting a great value meal – collecting tasty food at a reduced price.

There is the option for the user to donate £1 alongside his purchase, which will go towards providing a meal to someone who needs it.

IMPACT

Place: 7 European countries

Scale:  over 2.5 million meals have been rescued since 2015.  

Every year, 1/3 of all food produced is wasted. If this food waste were a country it would be the third largest emitter of CO2 – only behind the USA and China! 

ORIGINS

Jammie Crumie met his co-founder, Chris, at university in 2010. “We had a lightbulb moment when in Denmark – the amount of food that is wasted in the UK (estimated to be around fifteen million tonnes per year) and the number of people who have to visit foodbanks to survive are two massive issues. The two can clearly be linked, yet nothing seems to have been done about it.”

Convincing restaurateurs to change their long-established processes was a real barrier to the launch of Too Good To Go. Chris and Jamie spent months unsuccessfully knocking on doors of restaurants, cafes and bakeries all over London for months on end with only the bare bones of a website. “But after drumming up some interest we decided to move up from a website to an app and join forces with a group of Danish guys who were in the early stages of creating an app.”  The app was launched in 2015.

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • In 2 years, they’ve partnered with over 5,000 stores to fight food waste. 3 million people have downloaded the app. 
  • They are also in the process of recruiting volunteers who will collect the leftover food from the participating restaurants and deliver it to shelters, hostels and refuge centres. “We definitely want to develop an even more charitable side to the app, which will involve working alongside charities and foodbanks to get meals for those in need” explains the co-founder, Jamie Crummie

GET INVOLVED !

Get the app

If you’re living in one of the countries where the app is available (Danmark, UK, Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland), start rescuing some cheap and delicious meals from today!

Work for them

If you believe in a world where food produced equals food consumed  and your profile matches one of their many openings – the startup is growing fast! – apply today!

Get in touch

You want to get in touch to partner with their team in another way, get in touch here.

 

Choba Choba

Choba Choba

Choba Choba

SERVICE

Sale of premium Swiss chocolate. 

BUSINESS MODEL

Choba Choba has a unique business model : the cocoa farmers are shareholders of the company. They participate in the decision making and the benefits of the company.  Also, 5% of the sales are allocated to the Revolution Fund and transferred to the communities in direct payouts and in the form of shares.

IMPACT

Place: Peru (Alto Huayabamba)

Scale:  impacted lives of 36 families

Depth

  • Fair remuneration of the farmers for their hard work. Being co-owner, they define the price for their product.
  • They benefit from the profits.
  • They enter in direct contact with their consumers which is of “great emotional importance” to them.
  • Empowerment and pride: from simple farmer to entrepreneur. They have a voice in the company.
  • Better unity in the community as they share a common vision.

 

ORIGINS

About 8 years ago, Eric and Christoph met the cacao farmers of the Alto Huayabamba Valley through their previous jobs in the fair trade chocolate industry. Their initial business relationship quickly turned into solid friendship, considering each other part of their families today. Together they decided to challenge the rules by which the chocolate industry plays. So Eric, Christoph and 36 organic cacao farmers from two communities joined hands and founded Choba Choba in 2015. 

WHAT’S NEXT?

  • In 2017,  they launched a crowdfunding campaign to fund the “Nativo Project” to preserve the diversity of cacao by  protecting rare and native varieties, creating chocolates out of them and thus fighting against the industry’s standardization of taste.
  • They want their business model to become a role model for other small scale farmers and businesses. 

GET INVOLVED !

As a Consumer

Buy Choba Choba yummy chocolates online: special gifts, single bars and their exclusive subscription.

Work for them

Love food and would like to contribute in the chocolate revolution?  Contact Choba Choba to know if there is a way you can help!

Start Your Own!

Got inspired to create a business where ownership is shared with small scale farmers? Contact Choba Choba team for more insights on the business model.